10 Things To Do In between Croissants

When I was at university I read Simone De Beauvoir’s memoirs and fell in love with the French Existentialists and their subversive lifestyle. It seemed they sat in Parisian cafes long into the night, drinking coffee and cocktails and talking about all the important things: love and sex, politics and philosophy. Not only did they address the perennial question: How to Live? but they also knew how to dress. Think black: turtleneck and trench coats, berets and boots. I immediately adopted this Rive Gauche uniform but succeeded in looking more like a member of an unsuccessful punk band rather than a member of the French Resistance.

So it was with great excitement, but also a little trepidation, that I picked up Sarah Bakewell’s At The Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being & Apricot Cocktails in a bookstore recently. Would the adventures of Sartre and De Beauvoir and the other philosophers in their milieu leave me wondering if my life had been a complete waste with no meaning or purpose whatsoever to my existence?

Fortunately before I could succumb to my existentialist angst I got sidetracked by what the author was saying. “Existentialists think that what makes humans different from all other beings is the fact that we can choose what to do. In fact we must choose: the only thing we are not free to do is not be free…. I may be influenced by biology, culture, and personal background, but at each moment I am making myself up as I go along, depending on what I choose to do next. As Sartre put it: ‘There is no traced-out path to lead man to his salvation; he must constantly invent his own path.’ ” 1

What a terrifying thought. But perhaps it was also hopeful. Even though I may not have done anything exciting or worthwhile with my life so far, I could always choose to do so in future. Even though I was currently sitting in a cafe eating a lovely chocolate croissant it didn’t mean that I’d have to do it tomorrow. I was free to choose what to do with my life. Tomorrow I could begin training for the half marathon instead.

As I read on I was pleased to see that the author agreed with me about the hope stuff. She questions what Existentialism might mean for us today in an age where we have become uncertain about freedom and bombarded by the idea that there are so many forces beyond our control in the world. She suggests that although we find this a disturbing idea it is also reassuring; letting us off the hook of personal responsibility. “Sartre would call that Bad Faith. …Moreover, recent research suggests that those who have been encouraged to think they are unfree are inclined to behave less ethically.” 2

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Oh. Maybe it wasn’t so hopeful. I ordered another croissant.

This philosophical stuff requires lots of energy as does living in a world where there is so much to do and yet where doing anything at all seems so hard. Had I forgotten how to live freely? Was I just an  amoral automaton? I needed to take responsibility, and perhaps order a cocktail.

I decided to make a list. You’ve got to start somewhere and anyone can make a list. I spent a little bit of time on the heading for my list, after all it’s the first thing that I will read each time I use my list.

How to beat the forces of evil currently ruling the world (or things to do in between croissants):

  • make a date to see a friend
  • have a screen free day
  • read another book;
  • go for a walk in the park.
  • become informed about an issue;
  • do your job with care;
  • smile at a stranger;
  • give money to someone that’s hungry;
  • sign a petition or send an email to an MP;
  • order another croissant

 

1  https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/mar/04/ten-reasons-to-be-an-existentialist

2 p319  At The Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being & Apricot Cocktails, Sarah Bakewell, Vintage 2016

Images: Punks, courtesy of ‘A History of Bad Girl Clothing’ blog; and book cover: At The Existentialist Café.

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About sagesomethymes

Daniela is a writer, theatre producer and civic educator. She is the co-founder and producer for indie theatre company subtlenuance (www.subtlenuance.com) and has had poetry, short stories and non-fiction articles published. Her debut play, 'Talc', was produced in 2010. Her short play, 'Sicilian Biscotti', was shown at the launch of “Women Power and Culture” at New Theatre in 2011. Her second full length play, 'Friday', was produced by Sydney Independent Theatre Company, at the Old Fitzroy Theatre in 2013. Her play 'The Poor Kitchen' was produced in 2016 as part of the Old 505's Fresh Works Season and she co-wrote 'Shut Up And Drive; or Sex, Liberty and the Automobile' with Paul Gilchrist. It was produced at the Kings Cross Theatre (KXT) in 2016. 'The Poor Kitchen' was published by the Australian Script Centre in 2017 and is available at https://australianplays.org/script/ASC-1836.
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3 Responses to 10 Things To Do In between Croissants

  1. Pingback: In my own opinion

  2. G~ says:

    It’s always good to ponder on our philosophies. As an Existentialist myself I don’t feel uncertain about the future, because it is a certain outcome where we’re all headed, right? I don’t adhere to the thought that ‘there are so many forces beyond our control in the world.’ I think that we do have control of our own lives and that there is no predesign to it, except that which makes me human here on Earth. I believe that we make our choices as best we can in the environment in which we live. Sometimes, choice doesn’t fit into the paradigm of our thoughts, especially when we see and witness the many inhumanities that exist in the world. Someone has made a choice that inflicts that harm on others and the victims are left paralysed, or even dead. It’s not a choice they made, but an unfortunate circumstance. I just don’t believe that there is a greater force ourside of us (such as a God) that preordains our destiny etc. I exist, therefore I am. At least, this is how I see it, IMO.

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